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The frontier of 
Mind/Body Healing Dr. Robert Weissfeld About NeurOntogenics
Acupuncture is a form of energetic treatment. Energetic treatment addresses the movement of what is called, Chi or Qi in Chinese medicine, Prana in East Indian traditions.  Energy that flows throughout the body and mind, so they are not seen as separate, as in western thought. Though traditionally accessed with needles, acupuncture points may be treated with light (laser or other), pressure or micro-electrical current. In fact, anything that affects the body from a thought to a touch, to an herb, drug or nutrient will affect this energy.  Laser, microcurrent and needles are often used in  NeurOntogenics®  .
As a synthesis of a number of different therapeutic methods, NeurOntogenics®  uses different indications for acupuncture and other energetic treatments than Traditional Chinese Medicine. Therapeutic Targeting chooses points based on the body’s logic, which may or may not coincide with TCM understanding about the function of different points.
Emotions may be thought of as energy; E-Motion, energy in motion. Blocked and stagnant emotional energy are considered problematic, whereas flowing emotion is, contrary to general belief, often easy to handle. It is when emotional energy is uneven, that emotions get us in painful trouble.
Since the body and mind have the same energy, treatment of either will effect the other.
From Acupuncture Today These are The ABC’s of Acupuncture
“Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the oldest continuous systems of medicine in history, with recorded instances dating as far back as two thousand years before the birth of Christ. This is in sharp contrast to the American or Western forms of health care, which have been in existence for a much shorter time span (the American Medical Association, the largest health care member association in the United States, was formed in 1847, some 3,800 years after the first mention of traditional Chinese medicine).

Chinese medicine is quite complex and can be difficult for some people to comprehend. This is because TCM is based, at least in part, on the Daoist belief that we live in a universe in which everything is interconnected. What happens to one part of the body affects every other part of the body. The mind and body are not viewed separately, but as part of an energetic system. Similarly, organs and organ systems are viewed as interconnected structures that work together to keep the body functioning.

Many of the concepts emphasized in traditional Chinese medicine have no true counterpart in Western medicine. One of these concepts is qi (pronounced "chi"), which is considered a vital force or energy responsible for controlling the workings of the human mind and body. Qi flows through the body via channels, or pathways, which are called meridians. There are a total of 20 meridians: 12 primary meridians, which correspond to specific organs, organ systems or functions, and eight secondary meridians. Imbalances in the flow of qi cause illness; correction of this flow restores the body to balance. Other concepts (such as the Yin/Yang and Five Element Theories) are equally important in order to have a true grasp of traditional Chinese medicine, and will be discussed at length elsewhere on this site.

Many people often equate the practice of acupuncture with the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. This is not entirely true. While acupuncture is the most often practiced component of traditional Chinese medicine, it is simply that – a component, an important piece of a much larger puzzle. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses several methods designed to help patients achieve and maintain health. Along with acupuncture, TCM incorporates adjunctive techniques such as acupressure and moxibustion; manipulative and massage techniques such as tuina and gua sha; herbal medicine; diet and lifestyle changes; meditation; and exercise (often in the form of qigong or tai chi).

Traditional Chinese medicine should not also be confused with "Oriental medicine." Whereas traditional Chinese medicine is considered a standardized version of the type of Chinese medicine practice before the Chinese Revolution, Oriental medicine is a catch-all phrase for the styles of acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage and exercise that have been developed and practice not only in Asia, but world-wide.

Although the principles of traditional Chinese medicine may be difficult for some to comprehend, there is little doubt of TCM's effectiveness. Several studies have reported on traditional Chinese medicine's success in treating a wide range of conditions, from nausea and vomiting to skin disorders, tennis elbow and back pain. Many Western-trained physicians have begun to see the benefits traditional Chinese medicine has to offer patients and now include acupuncture — at least on a limited basis -- as part of their practice. More Americans are also using acupuncture, herbal remedies and other components of traditional Chinese medicine than ever before. The reasons for this vary, but the increasing interest in, and use of, TCM is due in large part to its effectiveness, affordability and lack of adverse side-effects compared to Western medicine.”

Acupuncture and energy medicine

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