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The frontier of 
Mind/Body Healing Dr. Robert Weissfeld About NeurOntogenics

NeurOntogenics®  - Stories of Transformation

Healing a memory of sexual abuse.

I didn’t know anything about Martha, a woman in her mid 20’s who didn’t stand out in any way, except that when I asked her, as I do in mini-demo sessions, “what one thing would you like to leave without today” she leaned in and said quietly “I was abused”.

We were in a fairly public setting, the entrance area of a bookstore, where people could overhear, though no one was standing around listening. While I am comfortable working with most issues, now I was hesitant, given the time constraint and public setting. I informed her of my concerns, adding that I wasn’t sure we could even make a difference in 20 minutes, but she said she wanted to go for it.

I asked her some very basic questions, and found out that the abuse, sexual abuse, had occurred when she was 7 or 8 years old.

Given the circumstances, I hadn’t the time or privacy to ask her any details. So I simply asked her if there was a particular memory or picture that came up when she thought of the abuse. Martha said there was. When I asked her how strong her present reaction to thinking about it was, on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the worst discomfort she could imagine, she replied ‘11’.

I had her lie down on the table, and requested that she gently bring up that memory while I tapped on her forehead several times to ‘lock in’ the focus, which has an effect like opening a file on your computer so you can edit it.  

At this point, kinesiology, (muscle testing) guides the process, informing me where and how to provide treatment to the body. Particularly in the demo sessions, where I don’t do a history or exam, the treatments I apply are mostly gentle reflex pressure to muscles or the spine, or occasionally use of a laser on an acupuncture point.

The rhythm of each session is different. Sometimes it is as if the memory were protected by multiple combination locks. There may be many self-protecting body tensions that must first be relaxed, or memories of other stresses and traumas that each need to be addressed to allow relaxation of a particular memory. This session, however was straightforward. Martha would focus briefly on the memory, and the body would ‘ask’, via muscle testing, for a simple treatment, after which we I would ask her again to bring up the memory and ask her to rate the discomfort.

Each successive treatment would decrease the level of discomfort, moving down to 9, 7, 4 and finally zero out of 10.  As is common, at each point the emotion or feeling that arises may be different.  Emotional pain that is overwhelming is often so because it is a jumble of many feelings and associations.  At 9, the predominant sub-feeling might be shame, at 7 sadness, at 4 anger, at 2 confusion. When I ask a person to focus on the sub-feeling, the intensity of that feeling might be 9 or 10, but it will typically be gone after treatment, replaced by the next sub-feeling.

At the end of the session, Martha could think about that memory with no discomfort at all, remaining completely relaxed and calm. Of course, for Martha, the work is just beginning. As with much trauma, particularly childhood trauma, effects go much deeper.  Trauma shapes the sense of self, embedding feelings like helplessness and expectations of a repetition of the trauma. This in turn changes the body itself, creating chronic armoring tension patterns that may change joint function, potentially leading to pain and degeneration.

As trauma is ‘detoxed’, we can regain what is lost. Trauma causes a loss of our natural sense of trust in our deepest nature which leads to habitual reliance on our defensive armoring.

The rhythm of each session is different. Sometimes it is as if the memory were protected by multiple combination locks. There may be many self-protecting body tensions that must first be relaxed, or memories of other stresses and traumas that each need to be addressed to allow relaxation of a particular memory. This session, however was straightforward. Martha would focus briefly on the memory, and the body would ‘ask’, via muscle testing, for a simple treatment, after which we I would ask her again to bring up the memory and ask her to rate the discomfort.

Each successive treatment would decrease the level of discomfort, moving down to 9, 7, 4 and finally zero out of 10.  As is common, at each point the emotion or feeling that arises may be different.  Emotional pain that is overwhelming is often so because it is a jumble of many feelings and associations.  At 9, the predominant sub-feeling might be shame, at 7 sadness, at 4 anger, at 2 confusion. When I ask a person to focus on the sub-feeling, the intensity of that feeling might be 9 or 10, but it will typically be gone after treatment, replaced by the next sub-feeling.

At the end of the session, Martha could think about that memory with no discomfort at all, remaining completely relaxed and calm. Of course, for Martha, the work is just beginning. As with much trauma, particularly childhood trauma, effects go much deeper.  Trauma shapes the sense of self, embedding feelings like helplessness and expectations of a repetition of the trauma. This in turn changes the body itself, creating chronic armoring tension patterns that may change joint function, potentially leading to pain and degeneration.

As trauma is ‘detoxed’, we can regain what is lost. Trauma causes a loss of our natural sense of trust in our deepest nature which leads to habitual reliance on our defensive armoring.